What are the Most Common CPAP Components?

There are a lot of odds and ends that come along with your CPAP equipment when first beginning therapy.  It can seem overwhelming, but luckily it’s not as bad as you think.  These parts are essential to your therapy, allowing your machine to function as needed.  Let’s walk through a few of the components.

Machine

Your machine does a majority of the work regarding your CPAP therapy.  It works by pumping air inside, pressurizing it, and delivering it to your airway in order to prevent apneas.  There are a lot of machines to choose from: traditional CPAP machines, APAP, or BIPAP machines.  Each work a little differently in that they are less or more advanced at changing your pressure throughout the night to fit fluctuations, but the basic premise is the same.

Mask

Masks come in a whole lot of shapes and sizes.  In practice, they fit over your nose, mouth, or both in order to shuttle air from your machine into your airway.  Which mask you choose is entirely up to you.  Full face masks cover your nose and mouth and are ideal for those who breath from both while sleeping.  Nasal masks cover only the nose, and can be used in conjunction with a chin strap to keep the mouth closed as needed.  Nasal pillows are a more streamlined version, using two pillows to insert into the nostrils to deliver your therapy.

Tubing

Your tubing, in its most basic sense, connects your machine to your mask.  There are upgrades you can make for your tubing.  Heated models are capable of warming up your therapy air to make you more comfortable, especially in colder climates.

Final Thoughts

Of course, the above outline is not a complete guide to the components of your CPAP therapy, but hopefully you now have a better idea of some of your options. Of course, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine what is best for your individual needs.

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If you have any needs, concerns, or questions, visit our main website at http://www.cpapplus.com/

We would love to hear your comments or questions.

Featured Product: The AirFit 20 Mask Series

ResMed’s newest line of masks is finally here!  The AirFit 20 mask series is ResMed’s most comfortable series yet, featuring quite a few key features to keep you sleeping soundly throughout the night.  Let’s start with the basics.  This mask comes with all of the basics that you’ve come to know and love about the ResMed series.  The AirFit 20 series is meant to allow easy disconnection from your therapy for brief pauses.  A quick release elbow allows you to remove your tubing from your mask if you need to get up momentarily, while the magnetic quick release headgear straps allow you to take your mask off completely to get that glass of water.  One of our favorite features of the mask is the flexible mask frame.  It bends and flexes with your unique facial contours to ensure there are none of those uncomfortable tugs or pressure points that could wake you up, and they’ve added extra padding on the frame to ensure maximum comfort.

 

Already we can see that the AirFit 20 series was built for comfort!  One of the added features is the development of an InfinitySeal cushion.  This cushion was designed to be as soft as possible, resting around your nose for the nasal mask, or around your nose and mouth if you decide on the full face option.  This cushion was designed to create a firm seal without suctioning on too tight, allowing you to rest more comfortably.  Both the nasal and full face option are great; they allow a versatility in sleeping position that is hard to come by if you tend to toss and turn during the night.  There is even a stylish option in the AirFit ‘For Her’ mask.  This mask features a trendy pink mask frame set, perfect for the woman in your life.  It can certainly help you take your sense of personal style with you even while resting!  Whichever you choose, the AirFit 20 series offers one of the most low profile designs available on the market.  If you find yourself feeling claustrophobic in some of the masks you’ve tried, this series could be a good option as it sits a bit lower on the face and below the eyes.  Whatever you decide, the AirFit 20 series is sure to be making a big splash in the CPAP market!

What Type of Mask is Right for Me?

There are many options to choose from when going through Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) treatment.  One of them, arguably the most important, is what kind of mask to wear.  Your mask delivers your pressurized therapy air from your machine into your airway.  For this reason, it’s very important that you choose a mask that fits your individual preferences, taking into account how you breathe and your comfort choices to provide a smooth transition into therapy.

Full Face Mask

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Full face CPAP masks are the most full coverage mask option.  They cover both your nose and mouth and are ideal for patients who breathe from both while sleeping.  Many users of full face masks often toss and turn much more in their sleep, finding that the larger contact area of the mask helps keep it in place better throughout the night.  Also noteworthy, these masks are a great option for men with facial hair, as their greater surface area helps keep your mask snug even with a mustache or beard.

Nasal Mask

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Nasal CPAP masks are essentially a smaller version of a full face mask, however they only cover the nose.  These masks are great for those who breathe solely through their nose while sleeping, and are still a good option if you toss and turn as the triangle shape helps keep your mask in place.  These masks can be used in conjunction with a chin strap in order to ensure minimal pressure leakage if your mouth happens to open during the night.

Nasal Pillow Mask

Nasal Pillow Mask

Nasal pillow masks are the smallest mask option.  They insert two soft pillows at the base of the nostrils to deliver your therapy.  These masks have a very light footprint and are great for people who stay relatively still while sleeping, as well as those who have found the larger mask options to be too intrusive on their comfort level.  Nasal pillow masks can also be used alongside a chin strap to eliminate pressure leakage through the mouth.

Oral Mask

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Oral masks are a relatively new design that inserts into the mouth between the lips and the teeth.  These masks have helped fill the void for users who breath solely through the mouth while sleeping, where previously these users would need to purchase a full face mask even if they didn’t breath through the nose at night.  Oral masks are held sturdily in place thanks to the way they fit around the lip and are a good option for those who find straps too near their eyes to be uncomfortable.

Final Thoughts

Of course, the above outline is not a complete guide to your CPAP mask options out there, but hopefully you now have a better idea of your choices. Of course, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine what is best for your individual needs.

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If you have any needs, concerns, or questions, visit our main website at http://www.cpapplus.com/

We would love to hear your comments or questions.

Will a Nasal or Nasal Pillow Mask Work Better?

When diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), many people can become overwhelmed at the number of choices they need to narrow down to effectively begin continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment.  One of the most important pieces of equipment you will need to choose is what type of CPAP mask would work best for you.  Your CPAP mask is the channel through which your pressurized therapy air is delivered into your airway, preventing apneas from occurring and keeping you breathing smoothly during the night.  There are many types of CPAP masks, but this post will focus on the nasal and nasal pillow masks.

Nasal
Nasal Mask

Both the nasal and nasal pillow CPAP masks deliver your therapy air through the nose exclusively.  These masks are ideal for people who breathe through their nose a majority of the time while sleeping.  However, even if you breathe through your mouth for a small portion of the time, these masks can be used in conjunction with a chin strap, an elastic strap that attaches to your mask and fits under your jaw to help keep your mouth closed.  Chin straps can be an important feature of these nasal oriented masks in order to ensure that your therapy is effective; if your mouth is open, the pressurized air can’t work to keep your airway open!

Nasal Pillow Mask
Nasal Pillow Mask

The differences between these masks are noticeable in their design.  Nasal masks are similar in design to a full face mask but smaller, with a triangle shape that covers the entire nose.  This can have a bulkier feel that some people find uncomfortable, however, it also provides a very stable seal that works well for people who move around a lot while sleeping.  Nasal pillow masks consist of a sleeker design, with two nasal pillows that insert into the nostril opening.  This is a more minimal design that only covers the bottom of the nose and the space between your nose and mouth.  The less intrusive design is ideal for those who stay relatively still while sleeping, as the smaller design can be more easily dislodged from tossing and turning.  Overall, this really comes down to personal comfort preference.  Both masks are completely functional at delivering your CPAP therapy, so whatever you find more comfortable should work perfectly!

Final Thoughts

Of course, the above outline is not a complete guide to the nasal masks, but hopefully you now have a better idea of if it will work for you. Of course, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine what is best for your individual needs.

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If you have any needs, concerns, or questions, visit our main website at http://www.cpapplus.com/

We would love to hear your comments or questions.